9/25/2012 (10:10am) 4,929 notes

7 Types of Cognitive Distortions

psych-facts:

Cognitive Distortions refer to our errors in thinking that lead to faulty assumptions and misconceptions. Aaron T. Beck, founder of cognitive therapy, believes that people with emotional difficulties tend to commit characteristic ”logical errors” that distort objective reality. He came up with 7 types of cognitive distortions. I will define and provide an example for each. 

Arbitrary inferences refer to making conclusions without supporting and relevant information. This includes “catastrophizing,” or thinking of the absolute worst scenario and outcomes for most situations. For example, you believe that someone doesn’t like you without actual information to support that belief. 


Selective Abstraction consists of forming conclusions based on an isolated detail of an event. This includes ignoring the context or other relevant details. For example, you fail a quiz and you think that this will ruin your entire grade, when really the quiz was only worth 3% and you still have an entire course to ace.  


Overgeneralization is a process of holding extreme beliefs on the basis of a single incident and applying them inappropriately to dissimilar events of settings. This is sort of like selective abstraction except you generalize the experience to other events. For example, after you failed the quiz, you think that you will now fail quizzes in all other classes. Another example is when you embarrassed yourself in public speaking and you now think that you will always embarrass yourself when speaking to anyone. 


Magnification and Minimization consist of perceiving a case or situation in a greater or lesser light than it truly deserves. An example of magnification is when you make a small mistake and you think that you’ve made a really big one. An example of minimization is when you failed a test worth 25% and you think that this will not impact your grade. 


Personalization is a tendency for individuals to relate external events to themselves, even when there is no basis for making this connection. For example, this is like when you blame yourself for something you didn’t do. 


Labeling and mislabeling involve portraying one’s identity on the basis of imperfections and mistakes made in the past and allowing them to define one’s true identity. For example, you screwed up in the past, and now you think you are an evil person

Dichotomous thinking involves categorizing experiences in either-or extremes. It’s a type of polarized thinking where events are labeled as either black or white. For example, you think that people are either good or bad. 

If you guys can come up with examples of each, message me. 

#Psych Facts#Neuro Love#Cognitive Distortions#Interesting

9/23/2012 (10:00pm) 1,571 notes

Personality Facts

psych-facts:

onlinecounsellingcollege:

We each have our own personality – that unique part of us that makes us who we are. It affects every aspect of our lives - from who we date, to what we study, to what we like to do. So what do we know about personality?

1. Birth order can affect our personality: There are traits we associate with being a first born (being bossy, motivated, high achievers or more driven); with being a middle born (being friendly, people pleasers, and quite skilled negotiators); and being a last-born (being amusing, more laid back, and also less responsible). Empirical researchsupports these norms and trends.

2. There are Five Core Personality Traits: These are measures of extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness.

3. Personality remains stable through life: The research findings are less conclusive here. It may be that some core traits are less susceptible to change. However, traits which seem less fixed and less stable over time include anxiety levels, friendliness and eagerness for novel experiences.

4. Certain personalities are more prone to disease: There appears to be a link between one of the “big 5 traits” (neuroticism) and proneness to developing headaches, asthma, arthritis, peptic ulcers and heart disease. There is also a link between having a Type A personality (and, in particular, scoring high on the hostility levels) and developing cancer andheart disease.

5. Our personality affects our personal preferences: The impact here is surprisingly far reaching. It includes: our choice of friends and partner, our taste in music, our political preferences, our career choices, our preferred holiday destinations and so on.

6. People can tell your personality from your facebook profile:Interestingly, although you might expect people to project an ideal online identity, research indicates that facebook profiles actually tend to convey our real personality. Sam Gosling, a key psychologist and author, has explained this in the following way: “I think that being able to express personality accurately contributes to the popularity of online social networks in two ways …First, it allows profile owners to let others know who they are and, in doing so, satisfies a basic need to be known by others. Second, it means that profile viewers feel they can trust the information they glean from online social network profiles, building their confidence in the system as a whole.”

7. There are a number of factors that contribute to personality disorders: An estimated 10 to 15% of adults are diagnosed with at least one personality disorder in their lifetime.  Factors contributing to the onset of these include: Genetics, relationships with family and peers, inheriting high levels of sensitivity, childhood abuse and experiencing a trauma.

8. Your pet may reveal your personality: Many people consider themselves to be either a “dog person” or a “cat person”? Research into pet preference and personality indicates that dog lovers tend to be more extroverted and greater people pleasers, whereas cat lovers tend to be more introverted and curious.

#Online Counselling College#Psych Facts#Personality#Facts

9/23/2012 (6:12pm) 879 notes

10 Tips To Increase Productivity

1. Set Daily Goals 

List up the things you want to do or accomplish for that day. It’s very easy to get distracted, so list your daily goals in advance (preferably when you wake up or the night before you sleep). 

2. Disregard The Less Important Tasks

If you can simply delete a task from your to-do list, then do it. Some tasks are not even worth your time when compared to the more important ones. Determine what’s most important and get those done first. To do this, list all the tasks you think you have to do, then put a number beside each one in order or importance. Then start deleting the ones that you realized are not important. 

3. Work During Your Peak Times

First, try to identify when you function best. Are you a morning person or night person? We are usually most productive when we are not distracted, when we can think most clearly and when our mood is good. Then set up your day to work during these times. 

4. Set Up Deadlines 

Set up deadlines for when to get what done. This forces us to start doing and not procrastinate. We often think we have more time than we really do and we leave everything until the last minute. However, by setting up a deadline, we constantly remind ourselves.  

5. Slice and Dice 

Sometimes, we dread really large projects but if we  break them down into smaller units, we’re more likely to complete them.

6. Try Not To Multitask 

Multitasking can make us distracted. So avoid opening up those additional tabs and just finish what you are currently working on. It’s recommended that once you start on a task, stay on that same task until you are 100% done. 

7. Delegate 

We don’t actually have to do everything ourselves. If we can get someone else to do it, then do it. This is true especially if the task is something we’re not very good at. It’s better to hire someone who is and work on something else we’re more productive on. 

8. Batch The Miscellaneous Tasks Together 

For checking emails, making phone calls, or social network updates, batch them together into a single time slot. 

9. Find Inspirations 

If we’re stuck on ideas or answers, look around for other resources. Look on the web or talk to someone we know who does what we do. 

10. Push Our Limits

If we’re tired and we’re still not done, keep pushing. If we notice ourselves complaining, identify that. If we notice ourselves worrying, put those feelings aside. If we’re sleepy, force ourselves to stay awake just a little longer.

(Source: neurolove.me, via psych-facts)

#Productivity#Lists#Psych Facts#Goals#Tasks

7/30/2012 (4:31pm) 1,617 notes

Counselling a Friend

psych-facts:

onlinecounsellingcollege:

You should never counsel your family or friends as you can’t be objective in a close relationship. However, you can offer support and be there for them when they need to unload and are looking for a friend. So what are some tips that can help you with this?
1) Encourage them to talk; ask them what’s on their mind - If you think your friend’s depressed or is bottling something up don’t pretend you haven’t noticed … ask if something’s bothering them. And unless you get the sense that they don’t want to talk, be persistent and keep asking in a gentle, caring way. This will send the clear message that you genuinely care.
2) Give your full attention and listen carefully – If your friend is brave enough to share what’s really bothering them, then give them the respect of listening carefully – without interrupting or offering them advice. Pay close attention and focus, and try to understand their perspective on their problems, and how that makes them feel. The only time you should speak is to clarify a point, or to ask open questions that will help them unload more. Also, encourage them to talk through your use of body language – such as nodding while they’re talking and sitting very still. Never fidget, look around or get distracted while they’re speaking – as that sends the message that you’re losing interest fast.
3) Unless specifically requested, don’t offer them advice - Once you’ve got the gist of what’s happening with your friend, resist the instinct to give them some advice. This is often very hard as we usually want to help … but most people resent this – they just want to be heard. Instead, the best way forward is to keep on asking questions to help them find solutions to their problems for themselves.
4) Remember it’s all about them; it’s not about you – Most people want to somehow turn the conversation round to talking about them, and their own experiences. This is so annoying; it’s the worst thing you could do. You are meant to be focused on your friend’s experiences!  

Read More

#Psych Facts#Online Counselling College#Friends#Friendship#Counselling

7/28/2012 (11:36pm) 1,960 notes

How to Spot a Psychopath

psych-facts:

onlinecounsellingcollege:

What kind of person could be a psychopath?  Professional have highlighted a few warning signs. They include:

Playing on our sympathy: Psychopaths will use us, will hurt and rip us off – then heartlessly play to our sympathetic feelings - and we blindly believe them and tend to let them off. But if this happens often, it shows a lack of conscience so don’t be fooled by their cheap and empty words.

Being manipulative: Psychopaths, in general, love to play with your emotions. They want you to jump, squirm, feel anxious or afraid.

  Being a parasite: The psychopath will use their charm and persuasion to get you to pay, or to meet their various needs. There’s rarely any benefit or payoff for you. You’re just being exploited – you’re a pawn in their hands. 

Being deceitful: They’re con men who’ll trick you and lie constantly. Their life is a deception; you can’t trust a word. But if you point to a snag in their tangled web of lies they’ll vehemently deny it, and jump to their defence. 

Highly charming: Psychopaths are usually charismatic characters. That is, they’re often mesmerizing, can pull in a crowd, and make a person feel like they’re a famous movie star. But it won’t last forever … they drop you and move on.

Read More

#Psychopath#Psych Facts#Online Counselling College#Interesting

7/26/2012 (8:39pm) 2,712 notes

How to Cope with Mood Swings

onlinecounsellingcollege:

1. Make sure you get enough sleep. A recent study by the U.S. Mental Health Association and the Better Sleep Council identified a relationship between positive moods and sleeping between 6 and 8 hours a night. Regular bedtimes were also important.

2. Keep your bedroom as dark as possible as this stimulates production of melatonin. (Low melatonin levels are linked with depression.)

3. Make sure you have a diet that supports brain health. For example, the following nutrients have been shown to promote more stable moods: B-complex vitamins, vitamin E, calcium, magnesium, zinc and fatty acids. Also, rapid changes in blood sugar can also precipitate changes in mood, so watch your consumption of refined sugar products, and make sure you eat lots of complex carbohydrates.

4. Try some natural remedies. Chamomile, lemon balm or valerian root tea are recommended for helping with anxiety. St. John’s wort is said to soothe the mind and relieve irritability. In terms of homeopathic remedies, lycopodium is believed to help with anger, and feelings of agitation; tarentula hispanica is used for mania; and chaste berry, red raspberry, black cohosh and sarsaparilla may help with female hormonal mood swings.

5. Include some regular exercise in your daily schedules. This releases endorphins, the feel good hormones. It also helps with insomnia.

6. Try and identify coping mechanisms that can ward off or soothe fluctuations in mood. Also, keeping a journal of negative triggers can help you interrupt a pattern early on, and work on strategies for coping with these triggers.

(via psych-quotes)

#Mood Swings#Online Counselling College#Psych Facts#Interesting#Coping

Millions of people have decided not to be sensitive. They have grown thick skins around themselves just to avoid being hurt by anybody. But it is at great cost. Nobody can hurt them, but nobody can make them happy either.

∞ 10,958 notes #Osho#Online Counselling College#Psych Facts#Feelings#Sensitivity#Quotes

7/25/2012 (9:55pm) 2,362 notes

Common Counseling Terms

onlinecounsellingcollege:

1. Abuse: Rude, hurtful, disrespectful and harmful use of another. It includes disregarding their personal boundaries and their inherent rights as an individual. Abuse can be verbal, emotional, physical, sexual or spiritual.

2. Acceptance: Valuing a person for who and what they are – regardless of what they’ve thought, said or done.

3. Acting out: Behaviour which reveals a person’s thoughts, feelings, inner conflicts and core beliefs.

4. Active listening: This is conveying that you’ve heard and understood the client’s situation, heartache and pain. It includes asking questions to fill in missing pieces, or to clarify uncertainties and ambiguities. 

5. Addiction: Any activity, behaviour or substance that becomes an obsession, creates a dependency and leads to withdrawal if the individual is preventing from engaging in/ using it.

6. Affect: Feelings and emotions that are displayed through body language.

7. Alters: The individual and distinct personalities of an individual with Dissociative Personality Disorder.

8. Anxiety: Feelings of nervousness.

9. Anger: A powerful emotion related to frustration of goals, abuse, hurt or disrespect of personal boundaries.

10. Boundaries: Where one person ends and another begins – with respect to physical, emotional and mental space.

11. Codependency: Caring about, and assuming responsibility for another person – beyond that which is healthy and legitimate – and to the detriment of your own needs.

12. Conditional love: This is where love is dependent on the person acting in ways that another approves of. It is, therefore, false love.

13. Counter-transference: When the counselor or therapists relates to the client as if they were someone in their own personal life (such as a parent, child or spouse) – because the client reminds them of that person.

14. Defense mechanism: Unconscious coping strategies that enable the person to deal with pain and trauma.

15. Dependence: An inappropriate feeling of need for a substance or person.

16. Depression: There are numerous types of clinical depression. Each includes a component of overwhelming sadness or entrenched low mood.

17. Empathy: The ability to put on another’s shoes, and to experience and walk around in their world, as if you were that person.

18. Enmeshed: Overly close or smothering boundaries.

19. Immediacy: The counselor’s ability to use the present situation, and what is happening between the counselor and client, to better understand the client and their issues.

20. Inferiority: The feeling of being deficient or inadequate.

21. Paranoia: Irrational and excessive fear of being watched or evaluated.

22. Projection: A defense mechanism where the blame is shifted from ourselves to another.

23. Psychotherapy: A more indepth form of counselling which searches for origins of problems in the person past.

24. Reflecting back content: Paraphrasing what the client has just said.

25. Reflecting back feelings: Picking up on and verbalising the covert or overt emotions of the client.

26. Repression: A defense mechanism which pushes unacceptable thoughts and wishes out of the conscious mind. These then become buried in the person’s subconscious.

27. Self-concept: The mental image we have of ourselves.

28. Self-esteem: The extent to which a person cares about, and values, themselves.

29. Subconscious: Thoughts and memories which are inaccessible because they buried below conscious awareness.

30. Summarising: Providing a brief and concise representation of the main points or ideas shared.

31. Transference: Where the client views or treats the counselor as if they were someone else – someone who is a significant person in their life (such as a parent or other authority figure).

32. Unconditional love: Loving and valuing a person no matter what they say or do.

(via psych-facts)

#Online Counselling College#Psych Facts#Counseling#Terms#Definition#Intersting

7/24/2012 (8:10pm) 2,049 notes

The 5 Love Languages

onlinecounsellingcollege:

Everyone has a primary “love language” - their way of giving and receiving love. This will vary from person to person, but will usually be one of the following:

1.    Words of Affirmation - If this is your love language, unsolicited compliments mean the world to you. Hearing the words, “I love you,” are important—hearing the reasons behind that love sends your spirits skyward. Insults can leave you shattered and are not easily forgotten.

2.    Quality Time - Nothing says, “I love you,” like full, undivided attention. Being there for this type of person is critical, but really being there—with the TV off, fork and knife down, and all chores and tasks on standby—makes your significant other feel truly special and loved. Distractions, postponed dates, or the failure to listen can be especially hurtful.

3.    Receiving Gifts - Don’t mistake this love language for materialism; the receiver of gifts thrives on the love, thoughtfulness, and effort behind the gift. If you speak this language, the perfect gift or gesture shows that you are known, you are cared for, and you are prized.

4.    Acts of Service - Anything you do to ease the burden of responsibilities weighing on an “Acts of Service” person will speak volumes. The words he or she most want to hear: “Let me do that for you.” Laziness, broken commitments, and making more work for them tell speakers of this language their feelings don’t matter.

5.    Physical Touch - A person whose primary language is Physical Touch is, not surprisingly, very touchy. Hugs, pats on the back, holding hands, and thoughtful touches on the arm, shoulder, or face—they can all be ways to show excitement, concern, care, and love. Physical presence and accessibility are crucial, while neglect or abuse can be unforgivable and destructive.

(via psych-facts)

#Love#Languages#Online Counselling College#Psych Facts

7/24/2012 (8:04pm) 3,145 notes

Some Facts on Dreams and Dreaming

onlinecounsellingcollege:

1.    Most dreams are based on visual images (Except in people who were either born blind, or who lost their sight at an early age). Occasionally, dreams will include sound and touch.

2.    The normal rules of logic do not apply in dreams. For example, the dream may be taking place in one location – then, abruptly, the dreamer is translocated to a completely different place.

3.    Most dreams occur in a house – but this is usually not your own home. The most frequently reported room is the living room. People rarely dream about their work place or school.

4.    The most frequent scenario is the dreamer plus two other people.

5.    Famous people seldom appear in our dreams. The vast majority of people dream about people who are significant to them, especially if there is an ongoing conflict.

6.    Mundane activities (such as brushing your teeth) rarely appear in dreams.

7.    Dreams tend not to be happy events, and the three most common reported emotions are anger, sadness and fear.

8.    Some themes are so common that they are reported the world over. These universal themes include the loss of a tooth, falling or flying, exhibition, arriving late for exams or other important events, and being chased or attacked.

9.    Cross-cultural research indicates that our dreams reflect normal life events in our own country and culture.

10. There appear to be some differences in the content of dreams between the two sexes. Specifically, women are more likely to dream about their children, family or household activities; men are more likely to dream about strangers, violence, sexual activity, achievement, and outdoor events.

(via psych-facts)

#Dreams#Interesting#Psych Facts#Online Counselling College

7/2/2012 (12:38am) 1,137 notes

Father-Daughter Relationships

onlinecounsellingcollege:

Research indicates there are six types of unhealthy father-daughter relationships. They include:

1.      The Lost Father: These are dads who may still live with their daughters but they abandon them emotionally. They basically ignore them, don’t praise their achievements, or comment on their successes and accomplishments. As a consequence, these daughters have low self esteem and lack confidence in their abilities. They feel completely starved of love and look to other guys to give them the attention and affection they crave and need.

2.      The Abusive Father: These are dads who communicate the message “my needs are all that matter – and yours don’t count at all.” Their moods and behaviors are unpredictable, unstable and destructive. They are quick to erupt in anger, are emotionally and verbally abusive, and may be physically or sexually abusive, too. Because these dads are dominant and controlling, their daughters grow up with no real identity. They are fearful or having and expressing an opinion, and prefer not to be noticed. They often expect to be misused by others, fear relationships and have low self esteem.

3.      The Pampering Father: These dads treat their daughters like little princesses who are pampered and spoiled from the day that they are born. Thus, they grow up with a sense of entitlement and they see themselves as special, and more deserving than others. This can lead to problems in all relationships as they are self absorbed and manipulative.

4.      The Toxic Father: These fathers teach their daughters that women are “one down” so she needs his help to make it in life. This makes it hard for the daughter to launch out on her own, and live a successful, independent life.

5.      The Ruined Father: These dads are broken men who need the support and constant attention of their daughter to survive. For example, they may be unemployed or have clinical depression – so they lean on their daughter “to try and make it through”. This leads to an inappropriate dependency that prevents the daughter from living her own life. It can lead to bitterness and anger in the end.

6.      The Anguished Father: This type of father-daughter relationship is slightly different to the other five types. Here, the daughter reacts to perceived faults, failings or indifference in her father  and acts out her anger through rebellious behaviour , anorexia, or  lifestyle choices that distress her dad. However, she’s not really free as her choices are reactions  and ways of expressing how she feels about her dad.

(via psych-facts)

#Daughters#Interesting#Online Counselling College#Relationships#Fathers#Psych Facts

7/1/2012 (2:07am) 3,145 notes

Some Facts on Dreams and Dreaming

onlinecounsellingcollege:

1.    Most dreams are based on visual images (Except in people who were either born blind, or who lost their sight at an early age). Occasionally, dreams will include sound and touch.

2.    The normal rules of logic do not apply in dreams. For example, the dream may be taking place in one location – then, abruptly, the dreamer is translocated to a completely different place.

3.    Most dreams occur in a house – but this is usually not your own home. The most frequently reported room is the living room. People rarely dream about their work place or school.

4.    The most frequent scenario is the dreamer plus two other people.

5.    Famous people seldom appear in our dreams. The vast majority of people dream about people who are significant to them, especially if there is an ongoing conflict.

6.    Mundane activities (such as brushing your teeth) rarely appear in dreams.

7.    Dreams tend not to be happy events, and the three most common reported emotions are anger, sadness and fear.

8.    Some themes are so common that they are reported the world over. These universal themes include the loss of a tooth, falling or flying, exhibition, arriving late for exams or other important events, and being chased or attacked.

9.    Cross-cultural research indicates that our dreams reflect normal life events in our own country and culture.

10. There appear to be some differences in the content of dreams between the two sexes. Specifically, women are more likely to dream about their children, family or household activities; men are more likely to dream about strangers, violence, sexual activity, achievement, and outdoor events.

[x]

(via psych-facts)

#Article#Dreams#Interesting#Psych Facts#Online Counselling College

6/30/2012 (12:45am) 558 notes

How to Deal with an Annoying Know-It-All

onlinecounsellingcollege:

1. Try to understand why they’re acting that way. Do they feel insecure or have low self-esteem; or are they trying to hide the way they really feel inside?

2. Ignore them when they butt in or they answer others’ questions, or when they tell a story that’s designed to impress. Simply smile, nod your head, and then talk to someone else.

3. Tease them gently so they see that other people aren’t impressed – and that everyone has views that it is worth listening to.

4. If you’re friends, try and tell them how they sometimes come across. But do it when you’re on your own, and don’t be unkind or harsh. Remember – your goal is to help, and not humiliate, your friend.

5. If nothing seems to work, then try to stay away from them. This friendship is doomed and unlikely to last.

(via psych-facts)

#Know It All#People#How to Deal#Online Counselling College#Psych Facts#Article#Interesting#Psychology

6/29/2012 (11:35pm) 849 notes

Your Seat in the Car - The Five Space Motivation Map

psychjournalism:

Ever heard the phrase “take the backseat for a while” when people talk about getting things done? Well here’s a couple more car positions of that nature.

  • The back seat right window:

You’re the curious one who has taken it upon yourself to follow the steps of your mentor, the driver. You clearly see the facial expressions and decision making of the one controlling the vehicle, however you get distracted by the window next to you, often forgetting that you are trying to reach a certain destination.

  • The left window seat:

You’re the guy that doesn’t care about drive. You have only a slight idea of where you’re going, and until you get there you’re going to sleep. With your mouth open.

  • The middle backseat:

You’re the unfortunate soul who gets squished between hairy-legged-day-dreamer on the right, and overweight actual dreamer on the left. You’re anxious to get to the destination. You’re trying to point out directions for the driver but the air conditioner is making it hard to be heard. You secretly hate the person in the passengers seat. You’re ready to have more control of the route but you unfortunately just can’t during this drive.

  • The passenger:

You called shotgun before everyone even got within 100 feet of the car. You aren’t 100 percent clear on the directions for the road trip, but you know sitting in that seat makes it seem like you’re practically co-captain. You’re extremely excited about where you’re going, but even more so, you’re enjoying the drive and how it feels to be the one who gets a full view of the ride but puts in mediocre work.

  • The driver:

You’re the multi-tasker. In most situations, like this, you put yourself to all the work. You knew if you didn’t drive, the five of you would all end up in a different state, dead, or both. You keep yourself alert with not only the traffic, but with planning what you have to do when you reach the destination. You consider yourself the only captain of the ride. You do this resiliently. 

(Source: optimismforjournalism, via psych-facts)

#Car#PsychJournalism#Travel#Psych Facts

6/29/2012 (12:24am) 8,453 notes

4 Types of Unhealthy Mother-Daughter Relationship

onlinecounsellingcollege:

1. Bosom Buddies: This is where the mother wants to be her daughter’s best friend. The relationship is usually warm and close, and the mother prides herself on always being there to emotionally support and advise her daughter. Communication is open, honest and real – which can start to feel threatening as the daughter gets older and wants to erect appropriate boundaries. In this type of mother-daughter bond, the mothers lives vicariously through her daughter and find it hard to discipline appropriately (as she’s too enmeshed with her daughter’s life).

2. Boss and Subordinate: This is where the mother wants to dominate and control every aspect of her daughter’s life. She’s always giving her opinion, making demands, and requiring her daughter to follow her rules, or live up to the expectations she has set. She’s also rigid, harsh and may lack empathy. Although the daughter may comply in her younger years, she is quietly resentful and will likely rebel – either strongly and loudly, or in a more passive way. She may feel she must be “perfect”, have low self-esteem and fear rejection and judgement by others.

3. Rivals: This is where the mother sees her daughter as a rival or threat so she’s always in competition with her. Thus, instead of seeing each other as completely separate people, and allowing each other to simply be themselves, the mother and daughter are constantly comparing themselves to see which one is thinner, smarter, prettier or more successful in life. This is usually done in a fun-loving way, and the bond they share is understanding and strong.  However, it can lead to a feeling of not being seen, valued and accepted as they are – and unconditionally.

4. The Role-Reversal Relationship: This is where the mother expects her daughter to be there to support and bolster her. She has no concern for her daughter’s needs as her focus is ensuring her daughter nurtures her. This is clearly unhealthy as the daughter feels abandoned, and grows up feeling neglected and used.  As a child, the daughter’s learned she must sacrifice herself and only think others, and their needs and preferences. This can lead to being a doormat, and to low self-esteem.

(via psych-facts)

#Daughters#Interesting#Mothers#Online Counselling College#Relationships#Unhealthy#Psych Facts